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Genital wart in Adult
See also in: Anogenital
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Genital wart in Adult

See also in: Anogenital
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Contributors: Priyanka Vedak MD, Susan Burgin MD
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Synopsis

Condyloma acuminata are warts that occur secondary to infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), a double-stranded DNA that belongs to the family of Papillomaviridae. The incubation period from exposure to lesion development can last from months to years. High-risk and low-risk genotypes of HPV have been identified based on their prevalence in intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinomas. High-risk genotypes include types 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, and low-risk genotypes include types 6 and 11.

Transmission of HPV infection can occur through either direct contact, autoinoculation, or fomite transfer. The average incubation period for warts ranges from 2-3 months but can extend to 1 year. Most lesions are symptomless; however, associated symptoms can include itching, bleeding, and dyspareunia.

The highest risk population for HPV infection is sexually active women younger than 26 years. However, HPV infection can affect both genders and a wide span of ages from infants to the elderly.

During pregnancy, condyloma acuminata can demonstrate rapid growth. The presence of condyloma acuminata has been associated with higher cesarean delivery rates. There is a small risk of transmission to the infant, with studies estimating the risk of maternal-child transmission with development of disease in the child to be 1 in 1500.

In immunosuppressed patients, warts proliferate due to suppressed cellular immunity and carry a risk of carcinogenesis. An increased prevalence of anogenital warts is noted in this population. Recurrences are common and response to treatment is impaired.

Related topic: Oral mucosal wart

Codes

ICD10CM:
A63.0 – Anogenital (venereal) warts

SNOMEDCT:
240542006 – Condyloma acuminatum

Look For

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Diagnostic Pearls

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

There are many verrucous-looking lesions of the genitals:
The giant condyloma or Buschke-Lowenstein tumor is a slow-growing, cauliflower-like tumor that is locally aggressive and destructive. It can demonstrate malignant transformation.

Best Tests

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Management Pearls

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Therapy

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References

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Last Reviewed: 11/21/2017
Last Updated: 12/08/2017
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Genital wart in Adult
See also in: Anogenital
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Genital wart : Verrucous scaly papule, Verrucous scaly plaque
Clinical image of Genital wart
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