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Listeriosis - Skin
See also in: Immunocompromised, HIV and AIDS
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Listeriosis - Skin

See also in: Immunocompromised, HIV and AIDS
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Contributors: Lowell A. Goldsmith MD, MPH, Art Papier MD, William Van Stoecker MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Listeriosis is caused by infection with the gram-positive bacillus Listeria monocytogenes. The organisms infect farm and laboratory animals worldwide and are rarely directly transferred to humans by handling infected animals. Ingestion of contaminated milk, cheese, and poultry is the main source of human infection. Contaminated produce is rarely the cause, although there has been in increase in produce-related illnesses in the past few years.

Most adult infections occur in the immunocompromised, but adult infections in farmers and veterinarians do occur. Listeriosis is associated with increased susceptibility among pregnant women, who account for 1 in 4 reported cases in the United States.

Most adult infections appear to be subclinical, but clinical infections ranging from mild to severe have been reported. Severe infection can be manifested with meningitis or glandular fever-like symptoms.

Infections during pregnancy can lead to stillbirth. Malaise, aches, chills, and diarrhea have been reported in adults. Tender axillary adenopathy and meningeal signs are seen in severe cases.

Pediatric Patient Considerations:

The highest incidence of disease is in the neonatal period. See neonatal listeriosis for more information.

Infections during pregnancy via maternal infection by food or infected farm animals can lead to stillbirth and severe neonatal infections. Infection presents days to a few weeks postpartum. Neonates are acutely ill with malaise, aches, chills, and diarrhea; infection can present as meningitis. There is potentially high mortality in the neonatal period.

As with adults, in children, infection and illness are more likely in the immunocompromised. Infection can occur by ingestion of contaminated or unpasteurized milk, or ingestion of cheeses from unpasteurized milk.

Codes

ICD10CM:
A32.9 – Listeriosis, unspecified

SNOMEDCT:
4241002 – Listeriosis

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Diagnostic Pearls

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Pediatric Patient Considerations:

Best Tests

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Management Pearls

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Therapy

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Drug Reaction Data

Below is a list of drugs with literature evidence indicating an adverse association with this diagnosis. The list is continually updated through ongoing research and new medication approvals. Click on Citations to sort by number of citations or click on Medication to sort the medications alphabetically.

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References

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Last Updated: 06/02/2016
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Listeriosis - Skin
See also in: Immunocompromised, HIV and AIDS
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Listeriosis : Diarrhea, Rash, Farmer, Malaise, Myalgia, Contaminated milk
Clinical image of Listeriosis
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