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Metacarpophalangeal finger dislocation
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Metacarpophalangeal finger dislocation

Contributors: Derek T. Schloemann MD, MPHS, Danielle Wilbur MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Causes / typical injury mechanism: The most common mechanism is a fall onto an outstretched hand.

Classic history and presentation: Metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint dislocation typically presents with characteristic MCP joint extension and associated proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint flexion.

Prevalence:
  • Age – Most commonly seen in children and adults between the ages of 20 and 30 years.
  • Sex / gender – Predominantly male.
  • Finger – The index finger is most commonly affected. The thumb is the second most commonly affected.
Grade / classification system: The injury is classified according to direction of displacement of the proximal phalanx (volar or dorsal) as well as whether it will require surgical treatment (complex) or can be managed nonoperatively (simple).

Codes

ICD10CM:
S63.269A – Dislocation of metacarpophalangeal joint of unspecified finger, initial encounter

SNOMEDCT:
312844001 – Dislocation of metacarpophalangeal joint

Look For

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Diagnostic Pearls

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

  • Proximal phalanx fracture
  • Metacarpal fracture
  • PIP joint dislocation
  • Carpometacarpal joint dislocation
  • Flexor tendon rupture
  • Extensor tendon rupture
  • Sagittal band rupture
Pitfalls: Must rule out associated fracture.

Best Tests

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Management Pearls

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Therapy

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References

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Last Reviewed:09/14/2020
Last Updated:10/12/2020
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Metacarpophalangeal finger dislocation
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