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Mitral valve stenosis
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Mitral valve stenosis

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Contributors: Ryan Hoefen MD, PhD
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Synopsis

Narrowing of the mitral valve orifice, usually due to rheumatic heart disease. Other potential causes include heavy mitral annular calcification and congenital mitral stenosis. Patients generally present with atrial fibrillation and/or congestive heart failure. Other common signs and symptoms include cough, recurring respiratory infections, exertional dyspnea, hemoptysis, wheezing, orthopnea, edema, tachycardia, and heart murmur. Can progress slowly to thromboembolic event, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, right-sided heart failure, chest pain, and infective endocarditis. Adults may appear asymptomatic, but onset of symptoms in adults is usually between ages 20 and 50. Infants experience onset of symptoms at birth or within first 2 years of life.

Management is keenly focused on prevention of thromboembolic events. Therapies include anticoagulants, diuretic therapy, salt-restricted diet, and beta blockers. Prevention of rheumatic fever is essential. A variety of treatments are focused on specific symptoms and include percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy and mitral valve surgery.

Codes

ICD10CM:
I05.0 – Rheumatic mitral stenosis
I34.2 – Nonrheumatic mitral (valve) stenosis

SNOMEDCT:
79619009 – Mitral valve stenosis

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Best Tests

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References

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Last Updated: 10/28/2016
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Mitral valve stenosis
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Mitral valve stenosis : Exertional dyspnea, Heart murmur, Atrial fibrillation
Copyright © 2019 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.