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Scarlet fever - Skin in Child
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Scarlet fever - Skin in Child

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Contributors: Sarah Stein MD, Karen Wiss MD, Sheila Galbraith MD, Craig N. Burkhart MD, Dean Morrell MD, Lynn Garfunkel MD, Nancy Esterly MD
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Synopsis

Scarlet fever is an acute infection caused by the erythrogenic exotoxin of group A streptococcus, Streptococcus pyogenes. It occurs most frequently in children aged between 2 and 10 years. Streptococcal pharyngitis is the usual cause of scarlet fever; however, septic streptococcal infection, cellulitis, and infection during the puerperal period or surgery can initiate scarlet fever. The rash usually begins 1-2 days after symptoms of pharyngitis. After a 2-5 day incubation period, fever, nausea, vomiting, chills, malaise, and symptoms at the site of primary infection (usually the oropharynx) occur. Generalized lymphadenopathy occurs frequently, and splenomegaly occurs rarely.

Codes

ICD10CM:
A38.9 – Scarlet fever, uncomplicated

SNOMEDCT:
30242009 – Scarlet fever

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Last Updated: 03/25/2014
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Scarlet fever - Skin in Child
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Scarlet fever (First Phase) : Chills, Fever, Headache, Nausea/vomiting, Lymphadenopathy, Malaise, Pharyngitis
Clinical image of Scarlet fever
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