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Accessory breast tissue
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Accessory breast tissue

Contributors: Mary Gail Mercurio MD, Susan Burgin MD, Mitchell Linder MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Breast tissue begins to form in the fourth week of embryologic development along the ventral surface of the body as mammary ridges. The current prevailing theory of accessory breast tissue formation suggests that over time, these ridges regress everywhere except on the breasts, but in some individuals they may persist and contribute to accessory breast tissue (polymastia) and supernumerary nipples (polythelia). Occurrence is approximately 1% of the total population (females more commonly than males), although it may not be recognized until puberty. Rates have been reported as high as 5% in Japanese female individuals and as low as 0.6% in White persons.

Often patients are asymptomatic, and these lesions are noted during a routine exam, but patients may present with swelling or tenderness in the area that may worsen during puberty or pregnancy / postpartum.

Codes

ICD10CM:
Q83.1 – Accessory breast

SNOMEDCT:
18166000 – Accessory breast

Look For

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Diagnostic Pearls

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Polymastia:
Polythelia:

Best Tests

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Management Pearls

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Therapy

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References

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Last Reviewed:12/19/2021
Last Updated:01/30/2022
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Accessory breast tissue
A medical illustration showing key findings of Accessory breast tissue : Axilla
Clinical image of Accessory breast tissue - imageId=2799551. Click to open in gallery.
Copyright © 2022 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.