ContentsSynopsisCodesLook ForDiagnostic PearlsDifferential Diagnosis & PitfallsBest TestsManagement PearlsTherapyDrug Reaction DataReferencesView all Images (2)
Angina bullosa hemorrhagica - Oral Mucosal Lesion
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Angina bullosa hemorrhagica - Oral Mucosal Lesion

Contributors: Chandler Rundle MD, Susan Burgin MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Angina bullosa hemorrhagica (ABH) is a very rare disorder of the subepithelium that is characterized by the sudden onset of a tense, blood-filled bulla on the oral mucosa. The bulla may expand rapidly over 1 or 2 days and then rupture, leaving behind an ulcer that heals within 7-10 days. More than one bulla may be present, and recurrences occur in around one-third of patients. The soft palate is most frequently affected, but ABH may arise on most other intraoral sites as well, including the tongue, buccal and lingual mucosa, and tonsillar fauces. Pharyngeal and esophageal cases have been reported. Rare reported sequelae include hoarseness and excessive blood-tinged salivation.

This condition affects men and women equally and typically occurs in adults aged 50-70 years. The pathophysiology of ABH is unclear. While precipitating factors such as hot drinks, inhaled corticosteroids, trauma from an adjacent sharp tooth edge, chewing, or a dental procedure have been reported, around half of patients have no obvious precipitant. Some of the reported cases in the literature have had concomitant hypertension and diabetes mellitus. A few patients with drug-induced or idiopathic thrombocytopenia have been reported to develop ABH-like bullae.

Codes

ICD10CM:
S00.522A – Blister (nonthermal) of oral cavity, initial encounter

SNOMEDCT:
235025005 – Traumatic oral hemorrhagic bulla

Look For

Subscription Required

Diagnostic Pearls

Subscription Required

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Best Tests

Subscription Required

Management Pearls

Subscription Required

Therapy

Subscription Required

Drug Reaction Data

Below is a list of drugs with literature evidence indicating an adverse association with this diagnosis. The list is continually updated through ongoing research and new medication approvals. Click on Citations to sort by number of citations or click on Medication to sort the medications alphabetically.

Subscription Required

References

Subscription Required

Last Reviewed:11/21/2019
Last Updated:11/21/2019
Copyright © 2021 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.
Angina bullosa hemorrhagica - Oral Mucosal Lesion
Angina bullosa hemorrhagica : Bleeding oral lesion
Copyright © 2021 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.