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Chancroid
See also in: Anogenital
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Chancroid

See also in: Anogenital
Contributors: Gillian Lawrie MBChB, MMed, FCDerm, Anisa Mosam MBChB, MMed, FCDerm, PhD, Ncoza C. Dlova MBChB, FCDerm, PhD, Susan Burgin MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by Haemophilus ducreyi, a gram-negative facultative anaerobe.

Chancroid is rare in the United States, and prevalence has been decreasing worldwide. Infection, usually associated with sporadic outbreaks, may still be a cause of genital ulcer in certain regions in Africa and the Caribbean. Cases may be underestimated due to the difficulty in isolating the organism and subsequent underreporting.

Individuals in communities with high rates of commercial sex (sex workers, clients, and their partners) are at higher risk for chancroid. In addition, chancroid increases the risk for transmission of HIV. Similarly, HIV infection increases the risk of chancroid and leads to atypical presentations such as a longer incubation period, multiple ulcers, and extended healing times. Extragenital chancroid is also more common in HIV coinfection.

The period of incubation is 3-7 days. Patients rarely present with prodromal symptoms. The earliest form of presentation is a painful genital papule that becomes an ulcer with a shaggy (ragged) border within a few days. If the lesion is neglected and untreated, it can cause significant tissue destruction.

Codes

ICD10CM:
A57 – Chancroid

SNOMEDCT:
266143009 – Chancroid

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

  • The incubation period of primary syphilis is much longer than chancroid (3 weeks). In addition, the ulcer of syphilis is firm and painless, except in concurrent HIV when it can be painful. It also has a well-defined border that is not undermined.
  • The ulcers of donovanosis (granuloma inguinale) are beefy-red indurated ulcers that heal and scar and then start again in a nearby area.
  • Herpes presents with single or crops of multiple painful, punched-out ulcers.
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum begins with a painless papule, erosion, or ulcer that heals in a few days, sometimes leaving a small scale that disappears without a scar in a few days. Enlarged, tender lymph nodes (buboes) then appear.
  • Behçet syndrome is an inflammatory disease with painful genital ulcers that may heal with scarring, but it is usually preceded by recurrent oral aphthous ulcers and often has associated uveitis and erythema nodosum with recurrent folliculitis.
  • Lipschutz ulcer (vulva) or juvenile gangrenous vasculitis of the scrotum: present with sudden onset of painful ulcers following a prodrome of fever and pharyngitis or tonsillitis. Ulcers typically resolve over weeks with atrophic scars.

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Last Reviewed:10/18/2018
Last Updated:07/29/2021
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Chancroid
See also in: Anogenital
Chancroid : Foreskin, Glans of penis, Labia minora/vestibule, Shaft of penis, Skin ulcer, Bubo
Clinical image of Chancroid
Copyright © 2021 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.