ContentsSynopsisCodesLook ForDiagnostic PearlsDifferential Diagnosis & PitfallsBest TestsManagement PearlsTherapyReferencesInformation for PatientsView all Images (24)
Cherry hemangioma in Adult
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Cherry hemangioma in Adult

Contributors: Amy E. Blum MA, Susan Burgin MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Cherry hemangiomas (also known as cherry angiomas, Campbell de Morgan spots, and senile hemangiomas) are the most common type of acquired benign vascular proliferation and are composed of thin-walled, dilated capillaries. These growths often present in early to mid-adulthood and appear as small red or violaceous macules or papules that increase in number and incidence with age. Cherry hemangiomas are benign and thus do not require treatment unless irritated or bleeding (usually secondary to trauma), but are often of cosmetic concern to patients.

The etiology of cherry hemangiomas is still poorly understood, with evidence supporting either a reactive or a neoplastic underpinning. However, several recent studies examining the genetics of cherry hemangiomas provide strong evidence that they are benign neoplasms, as they frequently harbor mutations known to cause other types of tumors. Studies also suggest that hormonal influences may be involved, evidenced by spontaneous involution of lesions after pregnancy.

The strongest risk factor for cherry hemangiomas is age. However, studies have also identified associations between cherry hemangiomas and toxic exposures including mustard gas and bromide, and with a variety of more severe health conditions including melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer, noncutaneous malignancy, immunosuppression, and dyslipidemia.

Codes

ICD10CM:
D18.01 – Hemangioma of skin and subcutaneous tissue

SNOMEDCT:
5050001 – Senile angioma

Look For

Subscription Required

Diagnostic Pearls

Subscription Required

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

  • Angiokeratoma – Darker purple to blue color, scale or crust, and location on the genitals (scrotal, vulvar) or lower extremities are suggestive of angiokeratoma.
  • Venous lake – Look for darker violaceous to blue color and location on the ear or lip.
  • Lobular capillary hemangioma (pyogenic granuloma) – Larger size, friable surface, and ulceration are more common in lobular capillary hemangioma compared to cherry hemangioma.
  • Nodular melanoma – Look for skin-toned, brown, or bluish-black color and rapid growth.
  • Cutaneous metastasis – Typically firmer and more pink compared to cherry hemangiomas.
  • Petechiae – Small, red, nonblanching macules associated with systemic disease. Typically, many lesions are seen clustered together.
  • Bacillary angiomatosis – Found in patients with an immunocompromised state.

Best Tests

Subscription Required

Management Pearls

Subscription Required

Therapy

Subscription Required

References

Subscription Required

Last Reviewed:07/15/2020
Last Updated:07/30/2020
Copyright © 2021 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.
Cherry hemangioma in Adult
Cherry hemangioma : Trunk, Smooth papules, Arms
Clinical image of Cherry hemangioma
A close-up of discrete red papules of varying sizes.
Copyright © 2021 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.