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Craniopharyngioma
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Craniopharyngioma

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Contributors: Andrea Wasilewski MD, Jamie Adams MD, Richard L. Barbano MD, PhD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

A craniopharyngioma is a brain tumor arising from pituitary embryonic tissue. It is typically suprasellar and has solid and cystic components. Age of onset can occur in childhood (about age 5-15) or adulthood (about age 50-70). There are adamantinomatous, papillary, and mixed types. Adamantinomatous tumors are more common in children and papillary tumors are more common in adults. A Rathke cleft cyst may develop from Rathke pouch if the pouch does not close normally.

Craniopharyngiomas are usually slow growing, and symptoms arise from compression of surrounding structures or increased intracranial pressure. Presenting symptoms include visual loss (most commonly superior temporal quadrantanopsia), headache, hormonal imbalances leading to delayed puberty in children, amenorrhea, hypersomnia, diabetes insipidus, and/or decreased libido. These tumors are usually benign with a good prognosis, but often recur when resection is incomplete.

Codes

ICD10CM:
D44.3 – Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of pituitary gland

SNOMEDCT:
189179009 – Craniopharyngioma

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

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Therapy

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References

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Last Reviewed: 05/04/2018
Last Updated: 12/05/2018
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Craniopharyngioma
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Craniopharyngioma : Headache, Amenorrhea, Erectile dysfunction, Visual field defect
Imaging Studies image of Craniopharyngioma
Sagittal T1 weighted MRI demonstrates the mass in the sellar/suprasellar region. The hypointense portions of the mass are secondary to the calcifications identified on CT.
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