Contents

SynopsisCodesLook ForDiagnostic PearlsDifferential Diagnosis & PitfallsBest TestsManagement PearlsTherapyDrug Reaction DataReferences

View all Images (18)

Drug-induced corneal deposits - External and Internal Eye
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Drug-induced corneal deposits - External and Internal Eye

Contributors: Brandon D. Ayres MD, Christopher Rapuano MD, Harvey A. Brown MD, Sunir J. Garg MD, Lauren Patty Daskivich MD, MSHS
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Many different medications can cause corneal deposits (may also be referred to as vortex keratopathy or cornea verticillata). Some of the more common medications include amiodarone, indomethacin, chloroquine, and hydroxychloroquine. Very often patients are unaware of the deposits, and they are noted incidentally on routine eye exam. At times, the deposits can be very superficial and dense, causing foreign body sensation or reduced vision. Drug deposits tend to be seen in an older patient population taking multiple medications.

Codes

ICD10CM:
H18.009 – Unspecified corneal deposit, unspecified eye

SNOMEDCT:
418541005 – Drug-induced corneal epithlelial deposit

Look For

Subscription Required

Diagnostic Pearls

Subscription Required

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

The differential diagnosis for corneal deposits includes the following:
A partial list of the medications known to give corneal deposits includes the following:
  • Indomethacin
  • Naproxen
  • Amiodarone
  • Tamoxifen
  • Chloroquine
  • Hydroxychloroquine
  • Capecitabine
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Epinephrine
  • Rifabutin
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Thioxanthenes

Best Tests

Subscription Required

Management Pearls

Subscription Required

Therapy

Subscription Required

Drug Reaction Data

Below is a list of drugs with literature evidence indicating an adverse association with this diagnosis. The list is continually updated through ongoing research and new medication approvals. Click on Citations to sort by number of citations or click on Medication to sort the medications alphabetically.

Subscription Required

References

Subscription Required

Last Updated:04/26/2015
Copyright © 2022 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.
Drug-induced corneal deposits - External and Internal Eye
A medical illustration showing key findings of Drug-induced corneal deposits : Bilateral distribution, Corneal focal white infiltrate, Corneal pigmented lesion, Corneal small punctate white spots, Blurry vision
Clinical image of Drug-induced corneal deposits - imageId=2841676. Click to open in gallery.  caption: 'A green-white corneal deposit secondary to ciprofloxacin drops.'
A green-white corneal deposit secondary to ciprofloxacin drops.
Copyright © 2022 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.