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Enchondroma in Child
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Enchondroma in Child

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Contributors: David Sullo MD
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Synopsis

A benign cartilage-forming tumor primarily affecting the bones of the hand, femur, or humerus and most commonly affecting children and young adults. Most lesions are solitary and asymptomatic. Often an incidental finding. Onset is typically during the second decade of life, but may occur at any age. Usually painless, but may present with discomfort and pain, especially if the tumor leads to pathologic fracture. Pain may also be a sign of malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma; this is rare. Enchondromatosis (Ollier disease), a disorder leading to multiple recurrent enchondromas, has a much higher tendency toward malignancy. Multiple enchondromas are also associated with Maffucci syndrome. Onset of associated disorders is in childhood.

With enchondromas, often no treatment is necessary. Treatment should be considered if tumor is symptomatic or growing in size, or if there is risk of pathologic fracture. Surgical treatment options include lesional excision or curettage and bone grafting, with positive outcome. Nonoperative management includes immobilization and motion exercises and taping. Follow-up with radiography monitors bone consolidation. Chondrosarcomas are treated more aggressively.

Codes

ICD10CM:
D16.10 – Benign neoplasm of short bones of unspecified upper limb

SNOMEDCT:
443496006 – Enchondroma of bone

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Chondrosarcoma

Best Tests

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References

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Last Updated: 12/30/2016
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Enchondroma in Child
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Enchondroma : Exostoses, Hands and/or feet, Pathologic fracture
Imaging Studies image of Enchondroma
Multiple enchondromas scattered throughout the 4th and 5th fingers.
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