ContentsSynopsisCodesLook ForDiagnostic PearlsDifferential Diagnosis & PitfallsBest TestsManagement PearlsTherapyReferencesView all Images (17)
Erysipeloid - Cellulitis DDx
See also in: Overview
Print
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Erysipeloid - Cellulitis DDx

See also in: Overview
Print Images (17)
Contributors: Sruthi Renati MD, Susan Burgin MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Erysipeloid is an infection with the gram-positive bacillus Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, which is also an agent of disease in animals, especially swine. The bacterium is transmitted when traumatized human skin comes into contact with an infected animal or animal meat; therefore, farmers, cooks, butchers, and fisherman are most at risk.

Erysipeloid is predominantly a self-limiting disease affecting the skin in either a localized or diffuse form, but occasionally may cause a serious systemic illness in which the most common manifestation is endocarditis. Skin lesions consist of violaceous plaques and are most often confined to the hands. There is often associated pain and pruritus.

The lesions of localized cutaneous erysipeloid often resolve without treatment in 3-4 weeks but may recur. Therefore, treatment with antibiotics is indicated in all forms of erysipeloid.

Erysipeloid can be differentiated from cellulitis on the basis of location (fingers and hands), animal exposure, and more violaceous appearance.

Codes

ICD10CM:
A26.0 – Cutaneous erysipeloid

SNOMEDCT:
400105005 – Erysipeloid

Look For

Subscription Required

Diagnostic Pearls

Subscription Required

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Best Tests

Subscription Required

Management Pearls

Subscription Required

Therapy

Subscription Required

References

Subscription Required

Last Reviewed: 06/19/2018
Last Updated: 07/12/2018
Copyright © 2019 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.
Erysipeloid - Cellulitis DDx
See also in: Overview
Print 17 Images Filter Images
View all Images (17)
(with subscription)
 Reset
Erysipeloid : Bullae, Painful skin lesions, Pruritus, Vesicles
Clinical image of Erysipeloid
Copyright © 2019 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.