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Ischemic fasciitis
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Ischemic fasciitis

Contributors: Lindsey Mohney BA, Susan Burgin MD, Jeffrey Globerson DO
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Ischemic fasciitis, also referred to as atypical decubital fibroplasia, is a rare and benign reactive entity, classified within a group of pseudosarcomatous lesions, including proliferative myositis, proliferative fasciitis, and nodular fasciitis. Ischemic fasciitis is typically seen in elderly individuals with decreased mobility, most commonly in the eighth to ninth decade of life. Cases have also been identified in younger individuals with physical disabilities or abnormal posture. Risk factors for the development of ischemic fasciitis include immobility, debilitation, bone deformities, and the use of prosthetics.

Ischemic fasciitis arises from continuous or intermittent pressure, which leads to subcutaneous ischemia, tissue destruction, and subsequent abnormal, proliferative wound healing. Ischemic fasciitis is generally found overlying bony prominences, including the shoulders, elbows, sacrum, and greater trochanters. It mainly involves subcutaneous tissue but can also include parts of the dermis, muscles, tendons, and even the periosteum.

Codes

ICD10CM:
M72.9 – Fibroblastic disorder, unspecified

SNOMEDCT:
403990005 – Ischemic fasciitis

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Last Updated:09/28/2021
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Ischemic fasciitis
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A medical illustration showing key findings of Ischemic fasciitis : Bedridden patient
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