ContentsSynopsisCodesLook ForDiagnostic PearlsDifferential Diagnosis & PitfallsBest TestsManagement PearlsTherapyReferencesInformation for PatientsView all Images (22)
Kerion in Child
See also in: Hair and Scalp
Print
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Kerion in Child

See also in: Hair and Scalp
Print Patient Handout Images (22)
Contributors: Antoinette Chateau BSc, MBChB, DCH, FCDerm, MMedSci, Anisa Mosam MBChB, MMed, FCDerm, PhD, Ncoza C. Dlova MBChB, FCDerm, PhD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

A kerion is an acute inflammatory reaction that accompanies severe cases of tinea capitis (also known as ringworm of the scalp) and tinea barbae (also known as ringworm of the beard). Kerions may involve other hairbearing sites such as the eyebrows and vulva. Kerions are often caused by an organism from an animal or the soil, such as Trichophyton verrucosum, Trichophyton tonsurans, or Microsporum canis. New pathogens, such as Trichophyton Arthroderma benhamiae, have been identified.

A kerion will occur in a patient who has an intact immune response and develops an intense inflammatory response to the organisms. It is almost exclusively seen in children, but on rare occasions, it may be seen in adolescents and young adults. As in tinea capitis, this disease is more common in patients of African descent. It is more common in males than females and in those with short hair. Other risk factors include diabetes, anemia, immunosuppression, underlying malignancy, and organ transplantation. It is seen less frequently in HIV-infected patients; this may be due to increased colonization with Malassezia, which may inhibit dermatophyte colonization.

Fever, pain, occipital lymphadenopathy, and secondary bacterial infection may be associated. The intensity of the inflammation depends on the host immune response. If left untreated, scarring and permanent alopecia can develop. Patients with kerion may develop immunological dermatophytid reactions, which may be localized or generalized. The "ear sign" is a dermatophytid reaction that presents as erythematous plaques and papules on the helix, antihelix, and retroauricular region.

Kerions can be distinguished from cellulitis based on their location and the presence of other signs of a fungal infection, such as scaling.

Codes

ICD10CM:
B35.0 – Tinea barbae and tinea capitis

SNOMEDCT:
19087001 – Kerion

Look For

Subscription Required

Diagnostic Pearls

Subscription Required

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Best Tests

Subscription Required

Management Pearls

Subscription Required

Therapy

Subscription Required

References

Subscription Required

Last Reviewed: 04/03/2019
Last Updated: 05/06/2019
Copyright © 2019 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.
Kerion in Child
See also in: Hair and Scalp
Print 22 Images Filter Images
View all Images (22)
(with subscription)
 Reset
Kerion : Occipital lymphadenopathy, Scalp, Scaly plaque, Pustules
Clinical image of Kerion
Copyright © 2019 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.