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Laryngomalacia
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Laryngomalacia

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Contributors: Paul C. Bryson MD
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Synopsis

The most common cause of stridor in neonates and infants. Etiology is incompletely understood. It has been postulated to be caused by underdeveloped cartilage supporting the larynx or immature peripheral and central nervous system integration of laryngeal sensory and function. It manifests by the dynamic collapse of the larynx, typically the epiglottis, arytenoids, and aryepiglottic folds (in lay terms, floppy tissue above the vocal cords). Causes a wet-sounding inspiratory stridor that may be aggravated by upper respiratory tract infection, supine position, and activities such as feeding and sleeping. May be associated with other respiratory anomalies but is not typically life-threatening. More severe forms may be associated with gastroesophageal reflux, difficulty feeding, breathing disturbance while sleeping, and failure to thrive.

May resolve spontaneously or require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. It is uncommon in the adult population.

For more information, see OMIM.

Codes

ICD10CM:
Q31.5 – Congenital laryngomalacia

SNOMEDCT:
38086007 – Laryngomalacia

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Best Tests

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References

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Last Updated: 03/29/2017
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Laryngomalacia
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Laryngomalacia : Choking, Cough, Dyspnea, Stridor
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