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Lymphogranuloma venereum - Anogenital in
See also in: Overview,Cellulitis DDx
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Lymphogranuloma venereum - Anogenital in

See also in: Overview,Cellulitis DDx
Contributors: David Foster MD, Mary Gail Mercurio MD, Lynne Margesson MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is an uncommon sexually transmitted disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis. There are three distinct stages in the course of the disease. After a 3 to 30 day incubation period, a small painless papule or pustule develops that may erode to form an ulceration. This lesion is often asymptomatic and heals without scarring within one week. The second, or inguinal, stage begins 2 to 6 weeks after the primary lesion and consists of painful inflammation of the inguinal and/or femoral lymph nodes.

The third stage of disease in LGV is called the genitoanorectal syndrome. In women in particular it may present after asymptomatic first and second stages. Patients initially present in the third stage with proctocolitis, followed by perirectal abscesses, strictures, fistulas, and rectal stenosis.

Codes

ICD10CM:
A55 – Chlamydial lymphogranuloma (venereum)

SNOMEDCT:
186946009 – Lymphogranuloma Venereum

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Last Updated:10/24/2014
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Lymphogranuloma venereum - Anogenital in
See also in: Overview,Cellulitis DDx
Lymphogranuloma venereum (Stage One (Male)) : Pustule, Skin ulcer, Smooth papule, Inguinal region
Clinical image of Lymphogranuloma venereum
A bubo, appearing as confluent crusted and scarred tumors in the inguinal area.
Copyright © 2021 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.