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Metastatic adenocarcinoma
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Metastatic adenocarcinoma

Contributors: Michael W. Winter MD, Carla Casulo MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Malignant cancer of glandular origin, or resembling glandular secretory properties, which has spread to a distant location outside the site of origin. Common sites are lymph nodes, lungs, liver, and bones. May invade pancreas, breast, small intestine, and prostate. Signs and symptoms include abdominal pain, bone pain, cachexia, diarrhea, dyspnea, hepatomegaly, icterus, regional lymphadenopathy, and vomiting.

Management depends on the extent and location of the metastases. Treatment of specific organ systems should follow treatment guidelines for that organ system, as in the case of prostate or breast cancer. Treatments can include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and resection.

Codes

ICD10CM:
C79.9 – Secondary malignant neoplasm of unspecified site

SNOMEDCT:
4590003 – Adenocarcinoma, metastatic

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Metastatic adenocarcinoma can come from a number of sites including lung, pancreas, colon, and prostate. When metastatic, it can behave in a site-specific way depending on where the cancer has spread. Metastatic adenocarcinoma may manifest in the brain, liver, lung, lymph nodes, bone, and even bone marrow. Treatment would depend on primary origin.

Best Tests

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References

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Last Updated:08/18/2016
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Metastatic adenocarcinoma
Metastatic adenocarcinoma : Abdominal pain, Diarrhea, Hepatomegaly, Vomiting, Bone pain, Regional lymphadenopathy, Dyspnea, Cachexia, Icterus
Clinical image of Metastatic adenocarcinoma
Copyright © 2021 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.