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Patellofemoral pain syndrome
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Patellofemoral pain syndrome

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Synopsis

Gradual onset anterior knee pain occurring in otherwise healthy, active young adults and adolescents, more commonly young women. Pain occurs in the area of patella and retinaculum, observable upon clinical examination following elimination of other conditions. Seen frequently in sports medicine, it is most often attributable to overuse, running, cycling, stair climbing, squatting, knee-flexing activity, or high-intensity training. May be exacerbated by poor-fitting running shoes, incorrect training form, prior injury, or knee surgery. Other signs and symptoms include limping, joint crepitus, stiffness or tenderness in the joint, and sometimes erythema, limited range of motion, and skin warm to the touch.

Etiology is complex with many factors contributing to patellar dysfunction, such as imbalance of patellar tracking in extensor / flexor movements, excessive load on knee joint, dynamic or functional valgus alignment, weak hip abductors, and internally rotated femur or tibia. Other associations include hip, muscle, and quadriceps dysfunction, patellar hypermobility, or constricted patellar mobility.

Noninvasive multimodal management includes modification or avoidance of pain-causing activity, use of knee or foot orthoses, and patellar taping. Physical therapy offers several approaches aimed at reducing pain and improving patellar tracking. Pharmacological treatment of pain and other symptoms are generally short-term. Arthroscopic surgical treatment is not generally recommended.

Codes

ICD10CM:
M22.2X9 – Patellofemoral disorders, unspecified knee

SNOMEDCT:
430725003 – Patellofemoral stress syndrome

References

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Last Updated: 10/04/2016
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Patellofemoral pain syndrome
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Patellofemoral pain syndrome (Adolescent/ Young Adult) : Joint stiffness, Joint tenderness, Knee pain, Sporting activity, Vigorous exercise
Copyright © 2019 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.