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Snapping hip
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Snapping hip

Contributors: Alan Hwang MD, Katie Rizzone MD, MPH
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Snapping hip syndrome, also known as coxa saltans, is a term that encompasses 3 separate etiologies. It is a common pathology among the general population with a prevalence of 5%-10%, with increased prevalence among those who do repetitive motions (eg, dancers). Most cases of snapping hip are painless.

The first subtype of snapping hip is the internal snapping hip, which is caused by sudden subluxation of the iliopsoas tendon over a structural prominence as it moves from lateral to medial. Offending structures can include the femoral head, the iliopectineal ridge, exostoses of the lesser trochanter, and the iliopsoas bursa.

The second subtype is the external snapping hip, caused by the sudden subluxation of the iliotibial (IT) band over the greater trochanter as the hip moves from extension into flexion.

The third subtype of snapping hip is due to intraarticular pathology. This can be caused by labral tears that become entrapped between the femoral head and acetabulum, during range of motion, or by intraarticular loose bodies.

Codes

ICD10CM:
R29.4 – Clicking hip

SNOMEDCT:
11568002 – Snapping hip

Look For

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Diagnostic Pearls

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Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Pitfalls:
  • Rule out intraarticular pathology or neoplasm as the etiology before making the diagnosis of snapping hip.

Best Tests

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Management Pearls

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Therapy

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References

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Last Reviewed:09/11/2020
Last Updated:12/06/2020
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Snapping hip
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