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Chorea gravidarum
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Chorea gravidarum

Contributors: Jennifer Vermilion MD, Jamie Adams MD, Richard L. Barbano MD, PhD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Chorea gravidarum is a rare complication of pregnancy. Manifested chorea consists of rapid, jerky movements in the limbs, trunk, head, and tongue. Psychiatric symptoms such as personality changes or depression may also occur.

Over half of cases of chorea gravidarum are idiopathic; the remaining cases are secondary to various etiologies. While chorea gravidarum was initially associated with rheumatic fever, it is now more commonly associated with autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, vascular disease such as stroke or moyamoya, thyrotoxicosis, drug-induced chorea, Huntington disease, and Wilson disease.

Most cases of chorea gravidarum occur during a first pregnancy, and the majority of affected patients have a previous history of chorea. Symptom onset is typically in the first trimester. In idiopathic cases, chorea resolves in one-third of patients prior to delivery and in two-thirds of patients soon after delivery. Symptoms may recur during subsequent pregnancies depending on the underlying cause.

Codes

ICD10CM:
G25.5 – Other chorea
O99.89 – Other specified diseases and conditions complicating pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium

SNOMEDCT:
25113000 – Chorea Gravidarum

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Last Reviewed:12/12/2018
Last Updated:12/28/2018
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Chorea gravidarum
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Chorea gravidarum : Choreiform movements, Dysarthria, Mental status alteration, Muscle weakness, Dysphagia
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