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Nasolacrimal duct obstruction
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Nasolacrimal duct obstruction

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Contributors: Paul C. Bryson MD
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Synopsis

May be due to congenital anomalies or acquired. Acquired obstruction may be produced by a variety of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Exogenous inflammation can result from pharmacotherapy (eg, topical ocular medications, chemotherapy drugs) or radiotherapy. Obstruction can also be due to infectious, autoimmune, traumatic, or mechanical causes. In infants, it may be due to incomplete development of drainage canalization. Patients typically present with excessive tearing or discharge. They may have a history of recurrent conjunctivitis or dacryocystitis with pain, redness, or swelling. May be unilateral or bilateral. Other signs and symptoms include continuous or intermittent discharge with sticky matter on the eyelashes and raw, red, irritated skin around the eyes.

Management includes nonsurgical procedures such as lacrimal sac massage, minor surgical procedures in older children, and more invasive types of surgery for unresolved duct obstruction.

Codes

ICD10CM:
H04.89 – Other disorders of lacrimal system

SNOMEDCT:
314022009 – Obstruction of nasolacrimal duct

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Best Tests

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Therapy

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Drug Reaction Data

Below is a list of drugs with literature evidence indicating an adverse association with this diagnosis. The list is continually updated through ongoing research and new medication approvals. Click on Citations to sort by number of citations or click on Medication to sort the medications alphabetically.

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References

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Last Reviewed: 11/22/2016
Last Updated: 05/10/2016
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Nasolacrimal duct obstruction
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Nasolacrimal duct obstruction : Erythema, Excessive tearing, Eye discharge
Copyright © 2019 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.