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Emergency: requires immediate attention
Rhabdomyolysis
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed
Emergency: requires immediate attention

Rhabdomyolysis

Contributors: Linden Brown MD, Art Papier MD, Paritosh Prasad MD
Other Resources UpToDate PubMed

Synopsis

Rhabdomyolysis is a disorder of skeletal muscle breakdown (necrosis) caused by muscle injury or myocyte membrane damage that leads to the release of myocyte contents into the bloodstream. Complications can include hyperkalemia, myoglobinuria, and renal failure.

The classic triad of presenting symptoms consists of weakness, proximal muscle pain, and dark urine; however, symptoms frequently occur in isolation and the classic cola-colored urine is not always present. It is important to recognize that symptoms may be absent early on, particularly in the context of patients with intoxication or those "found down" (discovered unconscious), so a high degree of suspicion is warranted.

Rhabdomyolysis can occur in any age group or demographic. The causes of rhabdomyolysis include toxins / drugs (eg, prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, recreational drugs, accidental ingestions, insect stings), physical trauma (eg, crush injuries), exertion (eg, vigorous exercise, agitated delirium, seizures, electrocution), muscle ischemia / hypoxia (eg, prolonged immobilization / limb compression, thrombosis, dehydration), endocrine / metabolic disorders (eg, hypothyroidism, diabetic ketoacidosis), electrolyte derangements (eg, hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia), infections (eg, influenza, HIV), body temperature extremes (eg, malignant hyperthermia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, hypothermia), and genetic disorders (eg, inborn errors of metabolism, muscular dystrophies). A triggering event is not always identifiable.

During muscle necrosis, intracellular myocyte contents, including potassium, phosphorous, creatinine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase, uric acid, and myoglobin, spill into the bloodstream. Myoglobin, a heme-containing protein, is filtered by the kidneys and can become nephrotoxic at high concentrations via intrarenal vasoconstriction, tubular obstruction, and oxidative radical injury.

Diagnosis is made by serum CK levels greater than 5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN). A threshold of 10 times the ULN is often used when the patient is known to be taking a statin. CK levels will rise and fall rapidly over the course of hours to days. A history of immobilization, traumatic injury, or new medication or recreational drug use may precede the diagnosis. Muscle tenderness, weakness, and renal failure are not required for diagnosis.

Codes

ICD10CM:
M62.82 – Rhabdomyolysis

SNOMEDCT:
89010004 – Rhabdomyolysis

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References

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Last Reviewed:04/21/2021
Last Updated:04/21/2021
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Emergency: requires immediate attention
Rhabdomyolysis
A medical illustration showing key findings of Rhabdomyolysis (Classic Triad) : Dark urine, Muscle weakness, Myoglobinuria, Creatine kinase elevated, Myalgia
Copyright © 2024 VisualDx®. All rights reserved.