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Malignant hypertension
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Malignant hypertension

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Contributors: Pamela L. Sloan MD, Benjamin L. Mazer MD, MBA
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Synopsis

Severe and rapidly rising blood pressure that can irreversibly damage the cardiovascular, renal, and nervous systems. Blood pressure over 180 (systolic) or 120 (diastolic), and sometimes lower, is considered a hypertensive emergency requiring immediate care. Other findings include headache, papilledema, impaired renal function, retinal hemorrhage, hypertensive encephalopathy, and microscopic hematuria. Less common in Western countries where antihypertensive medications are more commonly in use, it is mostly seen in underdeveloped nations and among immigrants.

Management requires appropriate response to hypertensive emergency, avoiding a too-rapid lowering of blood pressure. Treatments also depend on the extent and location of organ damage and presenting symptoms. Left untreated, prognosis is poor.

Codes

ICD10CM:
I10 – Essential (primary) hypertension

SNOMEDCT:
70272006 – Malignant hypertension

Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls

Best Tests

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Drug Reaction Data

Below is a list of drugs with literature evidence indicating an adverse association with this diagnosis. The list is continually updated through ongoing research and new medication approvals. Click on Citations to sort by number of citations or click on Medication to sort the medications alphabetically.

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References

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Last Updated: 06/21/2017
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Malignant hypertension
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Malignant hypertension : Headache, Microscopic hematuria, Papilledema, Retinal hemorrhage, BP increased
Clinical image of Malignant hypertension
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